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Author Topic: Which of these AAF rules should the NFL adopt?  (Read 70 times)
dolphins4life
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« on: March 16, 2019, 01:08:06 pm »

Teams have 52 players on each roster, with some selected by a territorial draft.[28] The territory assigned to a team consists of at least five colleges plus designated professional teams, one Canadian Football League, and four NFL teams (players from colleges outside the AAF footprint being allocated based on their most recent professional team). Only one quarterback can be taken from their region.[29]

For the inaugural season, a quarterbacks-only "Protect or Pick" draft was conducted in November 2018 in which teams could retain their allocated quarterback or select an unprotected quarterback from another team.[30]

Telecasts feature no television timeouts and 60 percent fewer "full-screen commercials," with the league aiming for an approximate real-time game length of 150 minutes, down from just over 180 in the NFL.[18][31]
In turn, the AAF aims to charge more money for the remaining commercial slots, also alluding to product placement opportunities that do not interrupt the game telecast.[2]

There are no extra point kicks; teams must attempt two-point conversions after a touchdown.

Defenses are forbidden from advancing ("rushing") more than five players on or across the line of scrimmage, and no defensive player can cross the line of scrimmage from more than two yards outside the offensive tackles.[32] The "illegal defense" penalty for violating these rules is a 15-yard penalty.

There are no kickoffs; possession at the start of each half, and after touchdowns and field goals, begins on a team's own 25-yard line, in line with the NFL touchbacks. After a safety, the scoring team receives possession at their own 35-yard line.[33]

In lieu of an onside kick, a team can keep possession of the ball by attempting an "onside conversion", a scrimmage play from their own 28-yard line and gaining at least 12 yards (essentially, a fourth-and-12 play).[34] A team may not attempt such a play after a field goal or touchdown unless it is trailing by 17 or more points, or during the final two minutes of the first half, or during the final five minutes of the second half.[35][36] The onside conversion play is also available after any safety,[citation needed] played from the 18-yard line.[32]

The play clock runs only 35 seconds, five seconds shorter than in the NFL, but still longer than the CFL's 20 seconds, timed from the spotting of the football. (The league originally proposed a 30-second play clock,[31] but Ebersol concluded it would negatively impact the quality of play).[2]
Players may not deliberately spike or throw the football into the stands or hand it off to a spectator following a touchdown; while other competitions (particularly the NCAA) have similar rules in place using rationale based on sportsmanship, the primary motivation for the AAF rule appears to be economic as its footballs (manufactured by Wilson Sporting Goods and marked with distinctive red, blue, and white stripes) contain expensive tracking technology. The penalty for such behavior is unsportsmanlike conduct, a 15-yard penalty, and if it is determined to be deliberate, a fine can be assessed to the offending player.[37] Other touchdown celebrations are generally tolerated.

There are no automatic instant replay reviews of scoring plays or turnovers as there are in the NFL. Each team is given two coach's challenges, which they can use at any time outside the two-minute warning, and receive a third if both challenges are successful. After the two-minute warning in each half and during overtime, the replay booth has sole authority to call for a replay review.[31]

Outside organizations handle head-safety protocols.[38]

In the event of a tie at the end of regulation, a single overtime period will be played, under the high school football rules of the "Kansas Playoff." Each team will begin on their opponent's 10-yard line and be given one possession (four downs) to score, with no field goals allowed. If the score remains tied after each team has been given their possession, the game ends in a tie. Both teams are given one timeout per overtime possession. The coin toss winner may choose to possess first or defer.[2]

In the postseason, overtime periods will be played until there is a winner, with teams alternating who goes first in each overtime period.[citation needed]

Playoffs will consist of four teams, the top two teams from each conference.[19]

Officiating has a ninth member, called a sky judge, an off-the-field official who reviews every play using technology like a booth review. The sky judge can call or take away penalties missed or made by the field officials.[32]
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BuccaneerBrad
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« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2019, 02:29:17 pm »

I would do the Kansas Tiebreaker OT because that ensures each team has at least one posession of the ball.   

Also add the sky judge which would keep the officials accountable when making shitty calls/non calls
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MyGodWearsAHoodie
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« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2019, 05:12:57 pm »

I like the sky judge.

I hate no kickoffs.

As for OT, I would eliminate it for all but playoff games.  If the score is tied at the end of four call it a tie.
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Fau Teixeira
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« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2019, 09:30:13 pm »

i like the sky judge alot actually .. they describe it as just another regular ref .. except they have a bank of TVs and camera angles and can throw a flag like any other ref if they see a penalty other refs miss
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dolphins4life
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« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2019, 09:48:33 pm »

i like the sky judge alot actually .. they describe it as just another regular ref .. except they have a bank of TVs and camera angles and can throw a flag like any other ref if they see a penalty other refs miss

The only thing that could make that tricky is holding penalties.
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stinkfish
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« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2019, 10:44:12 am »

I like the extra official, and the non review of every single scoring play.
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masterfins
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« Reply #6 on: March 18, 2019, 07:15:17 pm »

I like the no kick off rule, and the sky judge.
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